One aspect of the Winton Foundation for the Welfare of Bears’ work, is to support new and established projects around the world that help rescue bears that are suffering and in need and care for them from that point on.

At regular intervals, we will provide financial assistance and support for these projects, cementing our efforts as part of the global network of organisations working to prevent the abuse and exploitation of bears.  Please find below, more detail information about the projects we are helping, along with some lovely pictures.


WSPA – Balkasar Sanctuary
(November 2010 funding)

In November 2010 we made our first and biggest contribution to date to WSPA’s sanctuary in Balkasar, built to be a home for bears rescued from the brutal practice of bear baiting.  Our donation was used to buy food and veterinary supplies desperately needed by these dreadfully exploited bears.  Once they have been brought to the sanctuary, our assistance will help treat the terrible injuries sustained by these bears and then help fill their tummies when they are feeling better!

‘Sohrab’ relaxing in the Balkasar Sanctuary, rescued from the brutal practice of bear baiting. Photo ©WSPA and the Bioresource Research Centre

‘Sohrab’ relaxing in the Balkasar Sanctuary, rescued from the brutal practice of bear baiting. Photo ©WSPA and the Bioresource Research Centre


International Animal Rescue
(February 2011 funding)

In February 2011 we assisted International Animal Rescue’s work to carry out operations on their rescued blind ex-dancing bears who had lost their sight due to this miserable practice.  We provided £200 towards the cost of an Autoclave, a vital piece of equipment required to perform the operations safely.  Bears used as dancing bears often go blind from malnutrition or from being beaten.  Restoring or partially restoring a blind bear’s sight helps them feel safe and secure again, and enables them to mix with their sighted bear buddies at the sanctuary.

The operations to restore the blind bears' sight

The operations to restore the blind bears’ sight


Idaho Black Bear Rehabilitation Centre
(April 2011 and July 2015 funding)

The Winton Bear Foundation is a staunch supporter of the incredible work of Sally Maughan at the Idaho Black Bear Rehabilitation Centre.  IBBR rescues and cares for cubs orphaned after their mothers have been shot by hunters.  If the cubs were left in the wild, they would die from lingering starvation.  The lucky ones are brought to IBBR where they are nurtured and lovingly cared for until they are big enough and strong enough to be returned to the wild for a second chance at life.

Two of IBBR's cheeky residents

Two of IBBR’s cheeky residents! Photo courtesy of IBBR.


Animals Asia – China Sanctuary
(April 2011 funding)

In April 2011 we made our first contribution to Animals Asia’s Bear Enrichment Programme.  The programme significantly improves the lives of bears rescued from bear farms by helping to allow them to play, have fun and express normal behaviour which in turn can reduce their fear and distress, reduce discomfort and help reduce pain, injury and disease.

The building of the log wall, courtesy of Animals Asia

The building of the log wall, courtesy of Animals Asia

The log wall being stocked with goodies for the bears

The log wall being stocked with goodies for the bears

The bears will forage around for the food in the log wall, stimulating their natural instincts. The funding also covered the cost of a fire hose hammock and, true to form and poignantly symbolic, the first bear to try out the hammock was our adopted bear, the gorgeous and mischievous Bodo!

Beautiful Bodo - chilling out in his present from WBF!

Beautiful Bodo – chilling out in his present from WBF!

We were delighted to have this donation marked with a lovely plaque.

Our plaque!

Our plaque!


The BEAR League
(May and June 2011 and June 2014 funding)

In 2011 we made two donations to the work of The BEAR League in Lake Tahoe, California.  The BEAR League work tirelessly to educate and encourage people to live in harmony with bears.  Black Bears are naturally afraid of people but all too often wander into inhabited areas in search of food which very often gets them into trouble.

The BEAR League works to educate people on how to dispose of rubbish properly in bear-proof trash cans to help reduce ‘human/bear conflict’ situations and keep everyone safe.

We are making ongoing donations to the BEAR League and in June 2014 made another donation of £200.00

Martha, relaxing in the snow.

Martha, relaxing in the snow. Photo courtesy of The BEAR League.


Andean Bear Foundation
(July 2011 funding)

The Spectacled Bear is one of the world’s rarest species, under severe threat from hunting and habitat destruction.  In July 2011 we contributed £100 to the work of the Andean Bear Foundation to save this unique bear from extinction through their in-field scientific studies and through the rehabilitation and release of captive bears.

Spectacled Bear

Patricio Meza Saltos/SIMBOIE


Marko and Maria
(August 2011 funding via Hauser Bears)

In August 2011, The Winton Bear Foundation worked to help Hauser Bears care for two Brown Bears called Marko and Maria, brother and sister.  Since they were tiny cubs, Marko and Maria had been held captive in appalling conditions in a small cage outside a restaurant in Tirana.  Arrangements were made to move them to the Libearty Bear Sanctuary in Romania, and we assisted with the day-to-day costs of providing them with a good diet and care while they awaited their journey to the sanctuary.

Marko and Maria before rescue

Marko and Maria before rescue


Wildlife Trust of India
(August 2011 funding)

We are supporting the Wildlife Trust of India’s work to protect Sloth Bear dens during the weaning season, so that the cubs can’t be stolen to be used as dancing bears.

Cub forced into life as a dancing bear. Photo courtesy of International Animal Rescue.

Cub forced into life as a dancing bear. Photo courtesy of International Animal Rescue.

Sloth Bear. Photo courtesy of Wildlife Trust of India

Sloth Bear. Photo courtesy of Wildlife Trust of India


KWPLH, Indonesia
(August 2011 and January 2014 funding)

We are supporting the work of KWPLH, based in Indonesia, whose Sun Bear enclosure is currently home to five Sun Bears who were rescued after being taken from the wild and kept illegally as pets. KWPLH aims to instil a more positive attitude toward Sun Bears and their conservation, ultimately reduce the trade in wildlife, and create support for forest conservation activities.

The sun is shining on KWPLH's bears! Photo courtesy of KWPLH.

The sun is shining on KWPLH’s bears! Photo courtesy of KWPLH.

Their stimulating enclosure promotes natural behaviour, which is highly beneficial for the health and welfare of the bears.  The current residents are Bennie, Idot, Harris, Batik and Anna.  Anna often bosses Harris and Bennie around, but Idot pushes her around!


Polar Bears International, USA
(September 2011 funding)

We are supporting the work of Polar Bears International based in the United States and dedicated to the worldwide conservation of the Polar Bear and its habitat through research, stewardship, and education. Polar Bear International provides scientific resources and information on Polar Bears and their habitat to institutions and the general public worldwide.

Bottoms Up! Photo courtesy of Robert & Carolyn Buchanan/PolarBearsInternational.org

Bottoms Up! Photo courtesy of Robert & Carolyn Buchanan/PolarBearsInternational.org

Sleepy Head, photo courtesy of Robert & Carolyn Buchanan/PolarBearsInternational.org

Sleepy Head. Photo courtesy of Robert & Carolyn Buchanan/PolarBearsInternational.org


Animals Asia – Vietnam Sanctuary
(November 2011 funding)

In November 2011, we funded another two fire hose hammocks, this time ones that were desperately needed by the bears and cubs in Animals Asia’s Vietnam Sanctuary. Bill was the first to inspect the new gift, and after testing if it would take his weight he gave it his full approval!

Bill testing out the hammock WBF bought for the Vietnam Sanctuary

Bill testing out the hammock WBF bought for the Vietnam Sanctuary.Photo courtesy of Animals Asia

Bill deciding that the hammock’s ok! Photo courtesy of Animals Asia.

Bill deciding that the hammock’s ok!Photo courtesy of Animals Asia.


Idaho Black Bear Rehabilitation Centre
(January 2012 and June 2014 funding)

In January 2012, The Winton Bear Foundation donated US$500 to the Idaho Black Bear Rehabilitation Centre.  We are delighted to report that the funds will be used towards the cost of repairing and replacing nine out of their twelve dens after a very rowdy bunch of eight Washington bear cubs destroyed all but two of them before their release in June 2011.  Let’s hope the next residents at IBBR are more appreciative of their surroundings!

We are making ongoing donations to IBBR and in June 2014 donated £100.00 (US$170)

Picture of dens needing rebuilt, photo courtesy of IBBR

Picture of dens needing rebuilt, photo courtesy of IBBR

The above photo clearly shows how well the Washington cubs did with their ‘Demolition Derby!’ Mind you, it looks like one of the current residents is having a good go at finishing them off!


Get Bear Smart Society, Canada
(January 2012 and December 2014 funding)

The Winton Foundation for the Welfare of Bears is proud to announce that we are now supporting the wonderful work of the Get Bear Smart Society in Whistler, Canada. This amazing organisation works tirelessly to promote harmonious living between bears and humans. Sadly, many problems arise when there is not enough food in the wild for the bears to eat and they wander into towns, following their noses, in search of food. This often results in bears being shot or being involved in motor vehicle accidents.

Some of Whistler's Black Bears, photo courtesy of Get Bear Smart

Some of Whistler’s Black Bears, photo courtesy of Get Bear Smart

It gives me great pleasure to share with you the fact that we have just donated £100 towards GBS’s spring planting project. Our contribution will buy around 12-15 berry trees to be planted in the wild to help ensure enough food for the bears and prevent them wandering into towns and subsequently into danger. I hope you will agree that this is a wonderful project for WBF to support, and we are looking forward to continuing to back this wonderful organisation’s work.

Planting Berry Trees, photo courtesy of Get Bear Smart

Planting berry trees, photo courtesy of Get Bear Smart


Northern Lights Wildlife Shelter, Canada
(January 2012, December 2013 and June 2014 funding)

The Northern Lights Wildlife Shelter works to give a second chance to wildlife in need and since its opening in 1990, has helped 236 bears, including 3 Kermode Bears and 9 Grizzly Bears.  It is the only government permitted organisation allowed to work on grizzly cub rehabilitation.  Like IBBR in the US, NLWS works to help young bears in need and care for them until they can be returned to the wild.

The Winton Bear Foundation is helping fund NLWS’s rehabilitation success studies and their Black Bear release project in 2012, which will see around 5 bears (including the two lads below!) released with radio collars to allow them to be monitored via GPS.  This is a vital aspect of rehabilitation work to show that rehabbed bears adapt well to the wild, once they have been returned.  We are delighted to be supporting it.

We are making ongoing donations to NLWS and in December 2013 donated £100 and in June 2014 £100.

NLWS Yogi having a snooze

Yogi, having a snooze. Photo courtesy of NLWS.

NLWS Yogi and his buddy

Yogi and his buddy having an after meal snooze. Photo courtesy of NLWS.


Five Sisters Zoo, Bear Sanctuary (West Lothian, Scotland)
(March 2012 funding)

The Winton Bear Foundation are working with Five Sisters Zoo in West Calder in Scotland following their rescue of three ex circus bears, Carmen, Suzy and Peggy.  The highly dedicated staff at the zoo have worked tirelessly to rescue and rehome these bears who would otherwise have been destroyed.  We are happy to say we are working together with them to produce educational materials and raise awareness of the appalling abuse bears exploited for ‘entertainment’ endure.  Our first joint leaflet was produced in March 2012 and it’s been heartening to listen to the children talk about how bad it is that the bears were subjected to such suffering.

Flyer - Bears in Entertainment

Bears exploited for ‘Entertainment’


Idaho Black Bear Rehabilitation Centre
(May 2012 funding)

In May 2012, The Winton Bear Foundation donated £100 (USD160) to the Idaho Black Bear Rehabilitation Centre and took great delight in the fact that the funds will go towards a new swimming pool for the cubs to enjoy. The story to raise these funds and give the cubs a pool was an inspiring one…

Each year IBBR face repairs from mischievous bears, but with the swim tub they face problems with both the drain holes in the tub and drain pipes freezing.

This year, a leak froze the drain holes in the tub and the whole drain system. Consequently, IBBR was facing a major repair and rebuild. The swim tub became completely unusable and the bears, out of their winter hibernation, were checking it constantly for water. There was a small tub of water for them, but that was only for drinking.

Sally Maughan, founder of IBBR, said “To see them without the swim/water tub would break my heart and be so sad for the bears. The swim/water tub is their number one source of joy and fun for them”.

Therefore, the IBBR Facebook admin team decided that it was time to try and raise some funds specifically for a new swim tub for the cubs. On 24 March 2012, the admin team had arranged for an all day online Swimming Pool FUN(d)raising party where friends and supporters from all over the world participated in this exciting event, which included games, banter, bear jokes, bear stories, bear photos and videos – all in all, a lot of fun and a lot of prizes to be won that friends and supporters had donated in advance!

The goal was $3,000 (the estimated price of a new swim tub) which was nearly met due to the extremely generous help of IBBR’s supporter who managed to raise $2846.35 – when we heard this at The Winton Bear Foundation, we quickly decided that we would make up the shortfall to take it up to $3000; hence the $160 donation.  We were delighted to be part of this incredible fundraising effort by IBBR and it’s supporters.  Happy swimming cubs!

Three cubs at IBBR enjoying a break in the swim tub. Photo © IBBR

Life is good! (copyright IBBR)


Spectacled Bear Conservation Society, Peru
(May 2012 funding)

In May 2012, we donated £100 (CAD160) to The Spectacled Bear Conservation Society – Peru (SBC). The donation will go towards the cost of their work to protect the spectacled bear whose habitat is currently extremely threatened.

© All rights reserved by Spectacled Bear Conservation Society – Peru


Dedication Plaque at Five Sisters Zoo, West Lothian, Scotland
(May 2012 funding)

In May 2012, we bought a special dedication plaque in the name of the Winton Bear Foundation to go on one of the posts around Carmen, Suzy and Peggy’s sanctuary.  Funds raised from the plaques, go to the care and upkeep of the three rescued circus bears.  We hope this will help raise the Foundation’s profile and also help with the bears’ rehabilitation.  We hope you like the wording.

WBF Plaque

Winton Bear Foundation Plaque


Animals Asia’s Bear Enrichment Program –
funding for special toys for Oliver and his buddies.
(June 2012 funding)

The Winton Bear Foundation is extremely proud to be able to continue to support Animals Asia’s incredible work to rescue bears from the brutal bear farming industry.  The ongoing care of these severely traumatised bears after rescue is vital and we are staunch supporters of Animals Asia’s wonderful ‘Bear Enrichment’ program which provides toys and play structures that stimulate the bears and help them exhibit natural behaviour – an immensely important aspect of the bears’ recovery.  ‘Bodo’ is WBF’s adopted bear (read about him above) but we also have a special place in our hearts for Oliver, a truly remarkable bear and we are delighted to be covering the cost of some special toys for Oliver and his friends. This is Oliver’s story…

Unbelievably, Oliver spent THIRTY years trapped in a cage suffering the torture of bile extraction and being confined in a painful, heavy metal jacket.  When the Animals Asia team found him, they were faced with a sad, distressed and physically damaged bear.  He was unresponsive and in constant pain.  He became known, affectionately as their ‘Broken Bear’.

Oliver, incarcerated for 30 years (photo courtesy of Animals Asia)

Oliver, incarcerated for 30 years (photo courtesy of Animals Asia)

After release from his cage, came the journey from the farm back to the sanctuary. During this journey, Oliver’s condition deteriorated rapidly due to the bear farm owner having ripped the catheter that had been embedded for years, out of Oliver’s abdomen.

Under the most dreadful of conditions, the Animals Asia veterinary team had no option but to perform emergency surgery in the back of the truck where Oliver underwent a four hour life saving operation to remove his damaged gall bladder.  Thankfully, there was an immediate improvement in Oliver’s condition – perhaps this poor, sorry bear’s luck was changing at last.

Oliver’s joy at being released from his cage was plain for all to see and he loves his new home at Animals Asia’s Chengdu Sanctuary.  Considering he spent 30 years – normally the lifespan of these bears in a cage, he is now a curious, inventive and active bear!  He is stimulated and happy… and free.

However, due to the dreadful treatment Oliver suffered he is not as physically active as some of the younger bears who are more able to fill their time with rough and tumble games, so it is vital that Oliver can be given other activities to do to keep his mind and body active. Despite his stunted legs from being caged for so long, he loves playing in the water and with all the sanctuary toys.  In this picture, he’s obviously a keen fundraising as he appears to be running a tombola!

Oliver running a tombola, photo courtesy of Animals Asia

Oliver running a tombola, photo courtesy of Animals Asia

We would like to continue to help care for Oliver and assist his recovery, so we have funded some special toys, appropriate for Oliver.  We have purchased a selection of enrichment toys including 3 white canisters and some bamboo for making toys. These toys are used to hide treats and food in to encourage the bears’ natural foraging behaviour, staving off boredom as they spend lots of time trying to get the piece of yummy fruit or veg out of it. The bamboo toys in particular are used in the enclosures and for bears recovering from hospital treatment so you can imagine how important they are to the bears and the team (more photos to follow).


Get Bear Smart Society, Canada
(January 2013 funding)

The Winton Foundation for the Welfare of Bears is continuing to support the wonderful work of the Get Bear Smart Society in Whistler, Canada. In January 2013 we donated another £100 (CAD$160) to help them continue their work to enhance bear habitat. The funds will be used to plant more berry trees in the wild to give the bears an adequate food supply to help deter them from wandering into residential areas which of course immediately puts them at risk. We are delighted to help support GBS’s habitat enrichment programme to help protect their bears.

Grubs Up!

Grubs Up!
(photo courtesy of www.bearsmart.com)


Woodlands Wildlife Refuge
(January 2013 funding)

In January we donated £100 to a new WBF beneficiary – Woodlands Wildlife Refuge, based in New Jersey, USA. They have been rescuing, rehabilitating and releasing Black Bears since 1995. Our funding will help pay for material needed to secure the fence in their large bear enclosure to make it impervious to mischievous bears and their claws! Because it’s not quite strong enough at the moment, WWR need to wait until their rescued cubs are larger before moving them in to the bigger enclosure. However, it would be very beneficial for the cubs to be moved into the bigger enclosure sooner, so by helping fund the new fencing, we hope WWR will be able to do this.

Bear in Hay

(photo courtesy of Woodlands Wildlife Refuge)


Advancing Bear Care 2013 Conference
(January 2013 funding)

We are delighted and very proud to announce that, as part of our inaugural Bears Matter Month, we are working with the renowned Else Poulsen and the Bear Care Group, and are providing a sponsorship for their 2013 Advancing Bear Care conference. The sponsorship will cover the cost of one registration fee.  Please see our Bears Matter Month page for details of how you can enter the WBF Complimentary Registration Fee contest.


Idaho Black Bear Rehabilitation Centre
(Jan/Feb 2013 funding)

The Winton Bear Foundation is a staunch supporter of the Idaho Black Bear Rehabilitation Centre and the work of the amazing Sally Maughan.  Having cared for more than 200 orphaned and injured bears over 24 years, Sally devotes her life to caring for her bears and always puts them first, regularly going without sleep and working round the clock.  In February 2013, for the first time ever, Sally was brought a 7 year old Momma bear and her cub.  The Momma bear had been shot in the front leg and was about 80lbs underweight and with a cub, she deserved a second chance.  Sally says “Never in this lifetime or another one would I have thought that the opportunity to care for a mother and cub would come to pass. The opportunity for learning is priceless.  We are so excited about all the behaviour and information we will have the chance to observe between mom and cub while they are here.  Both are beautiful – the cub has a white diamond shape on his chest.  Mom’s wound has been treated and for now she is resting, eating and gaining strength.”  We will be following Sally’s amazing work caring for bear, mom and cub and getting them well enough for their eventual return to the wild together.  We have made an initial donation of £100 (US$160) towards the cost of caring for this special duo.

Mom and Cub

(photo courtesy of IBBR)


Animals Asia – China Sanctuary
(January 2013 funding)

In January we made a donation of £100 to Animals Asia to buy something for the six new bears they had just rescued from bear farms in China. Our donation was used to buy a new stereo so that the bears could be played calming and relaxing music while they are in their recovery cages to help them settle into their new home and recover from their horrendous ordeal – here they are listening to their new stereo.

Stereo with quarantine bears

Quarantine bears listening to their new stereo.
(photo courtesy of Animals Asia)

Xuan Xuan checks out new stereo

Xuan Xuan checks out the new stereo.
(photo courtesy of Animals Asia)


Animals Asia – Vietnam Sanctuary
(January 2013 funding)

Bear lovers will recall with great sadness the threatened eviction of 104 of Animals Asia’s beloved rescued bears from their Vietnam sanctuary at the end of 2012. Following the wonderful news that the eviction was overturned, we at the Winton Bear Foundation decided to buy a coconut for each and every bear in the sanctuary, as a special treat so that they could celebrate staying in their new home.  We received this lovely thank you from the Vietnam team and take great pleasure in sharing the photos.  Some of the bears preferred to throw some yoga poses and rub the coconuts on their heads – well, we never said they HAD to eat them! Enjoy!

“Animals Asia’s bear rescue centre in Vietnam received a very kind donation from the Winton Bear Foundation. The donation was made after the bear rescue centre was saved from eviction. The team purchased whole coconuts, one for every bear, which is a real treat for the bears as it is a novel, long lasting and tasty food item. Only our sun bears receive coconuts every week and they are cut in half. But this time around all our bears in the centre were able to fully enjoy the pleasure to play with coconuts, work out how to open them and get rewarded with the fresh juice and the tasty flesh. It took many of the bears a long time to work out how to open them, most thoroughly enjoyed rubbing the coconut with the brown husk all over their body before dropping it onto the ground. After repeated drops the coconut would finally break open. We have a group of disabled bears at our centre too, most of them missing part of their front limb. They were given the advantage of an already split coconut so they too could enjoy the tasty flesh inside. On behalf of all the bears at the Vietnam bear rescue centre, a very grateful thanks for such a thoughtful donation!”

Yin Yang

Yin Yang enjoying the feeling of the coconut husk on his head!
(photo courtesy of Animals Asia)

Cromwell

Cromwell is taking advantage of the large truck tyre, resting his coconut on it to make it easier to eat! (photo courtesy of Animals Asia)

David

David, the lovely Sun Bear managed to break open the coconut easily with his large and sharp claws.
(photo courtesy of Animals Asia)

Yin Yang

Yin Yang again, now throwing in some yoga poses too whilst continuing to rub the husk over his head – multi-talented!
(photo courtesy of Animals Asia)


The BEAR League
(April 2013 funding)

In April 2013 we sent £200 (approx US$300) to the BEAR League who work incredibly hard to keep their Lake Tahoe bears safe and to teach people how to live in harmony with bears. This donation is being used to support the BEAR League’s Cub Rescue Program. The funds will be used to purchase additional safe capture equipment and medicinal formulas for stabilizing emaciated and dehydrated cubs immediately after rescue. This is all very expensive and is always the difference between life and death when a cub is not found until almost the point of no return. Nothing matters but saving his or her life and it is vital that the team have everything on hand and ready to go or they risk losing a precious bear cub.

Truckee Cub

(photo courtesy of the BEAR League)


Valhalla Wilderness Society
(April 2013 funding)

In April 2013 we donated £100 (approx $CAD160) to the Valhalla Wilderness Society, a brand new beneficiary of the Winton Bear Foundation. The Valhalla Wilderness Society are based in New Denver, BC, Canada.  We are delighted to have started supporting them and this, we hope, will be the first of many contributions to their vital work to save the Kermode ‘Spirit’ Bear and its habitat.

Spirit Bear

(photo courtesy of the Valhalla Wilderness Society)


Five Sisters Zoo, West Lothian, Scotland
(April 2013 funding)

Following the devastating fire that broke out at the Five Sisters Zoo on April 14th 2013, which caused many animals to perish, we at the Winton Bear Foundation wanted to do our bit to help this wonderful little family zoo to get back on its feet.

The Five Sisters Zoo rescued three ex-circus bears Carmen, Suzy and Peggy in 2012 and have given them an incredible home and have lovingly nursed them back to health.  Therefore, to help ease the financial strain a little during this difficult time and to continue our support of their bear sanctuary, we donated £500 to cover the cost of some of the bears’ food requirements.

We pledge our support for their bears, for as long as it is required.

Suzy

Suzy
(photo courtesy of Five Sisters Zoo)


Carmen, Suzy and Peggy, ‘Vegging Out’ food fund appeal

In addition to the above support, we have decided to set up a special ‘food fund’ for Carmen, Suzy and Peggy, primarily to help pay for the cost of their fruit and veg shopping bill over the summer months, but also to help with the cost of their glucosamine tablets to help ease any arthritis in the elderly ladies’ joints and to help keep them as comfortable as possible.  The poster below has all the details about this special appeal including how you can donate.  Please give generously.

Carmen, Suzy and Peggy 'vegging out' poster appeal


Carmen, Suzy and Peggy – Glucosamine tablets
(May 2013 funding)

In May 2013 we donated £50 to the Five Sisters Zoo to pay for approximately two months of glucosamine tablets.  The tablets will help with any joint problems and arthritis the ladies may be feeling as a result of their advancing years and their decades of having to perform. We hope this will help ease any discomfort they may be feeling.  The picture below was taken just as Carmen was returning from a run around her enclosure – clearly the tablets are working!

Carmen running after joint meds


Melons Galore!
(May 2013 funding)

Also in May, thanks to the generosity of Winton Bear Foundation supporters, we were able to take through the first batch of fruit and veg.  The bears had put in a special request for melons, so their wish was our command!

The trolley full of goodies!

The trolley full of goodies!

Carmen enjoying her melon

Carmen enjoying her melon

Suzy enjoying her melon

Suzy enjoying her melon

Suzy enjoying her melon

Suzy enjoying her melon


Peace River Refuge
(July 2013 and July 2015 funding)

In July 2013 we made our first donation to a brand new beneficiary – Forest Animal Rescue, formerly known as Peace River Refuge. Based in Florida, US they provide lifetime care for non-releasable wild animals. We have made an initial donation of $200 which will be used to buy food and enrichment toys for their bears and some upgrades to their pool. (Photo courtesy of Forest Animal Rescue)

PRR bear


Animals Asia flood damage appeal
(July 2013 funding)

In July 2013 we bought £60’s worth of bricks to support Animals Asia’s appeal to secure their sanctuary walls following the horrendous floods in China and the resulting damage to their Chengdu sanctuary.  The sanctuary will be strengthened against future flood risks, keeping their bears safe and sound.

Cromwell

Cromwell is taking advantage of the large truck tyre, resting his coconut on it to make it easier to eat!
(photo courtesy of Animals Asia)


Panda Conservation Education
(October 2013 funding)

The Winton Bear Foundation is working with Sarah M. Bexell PhD, the Director of Conservation Education at the Chengdu Research Base of Giant Panda Breeding. We have funded the cost of around 2000 posters giving information on how best people can work to help save this beautiful bear and look after its natural surroundings.

The posters will be distributed to schools in the area and will help educate the next generation on how they can help ensure the survival of the Giant Panda. Through working with Sarah, we hope to be able to reach around 400 schools and as each school has around 600 or more students per school that means we can help play a part in educating around a quarter of a million children about the threats facing the Giant Panda.

Pandas


Grace’s Appeal
(October 2013 and ongoing funding)

The Winton Foundation for the Welfare of Bears has pledged to help raise funds for a very special little bear called Grace who is currently a Special Care Permanent Resident at Woodlands Wildlife Refuge in New Jersey, USA.  Grace suffers from a condition called osteodystrophy which means her bones have developed abnormally, resulting in little stumpy legs.  Sadly it is also thought that Grace is blind.

As Grace has aged her physical and visual capabilities have begun to decline and she is troubled with osteoarthritis.  As she moves into her senior years, we would like to help contribute to the costs of her medication and daily care costs and any enclosure enrichment that would benefit an elderly lady with her special needs, to help keep her as comfortable as possible.

We made our first donation of £300 (US$485) to Grace in October 2013, then in November – £350 (US$560) and December – £140 (US$230). In 2014 we gave donations in February – £250 (US$410), March – £315 (US$525), June – £315 (US$509), September – £335 (US$550).  To read more about Grace’s Appeal click here.

It is with great sadness that we received the news that Grace had died on 9th October 2014.  It was an honour to take her under our wing for the last year of her life and help Woodlands Wildlife in their wonderful care of such a special bear.  She will never be forgotten.


Five Sisters Zoo Bears
(February 2014 funding)

A big thank you to Littleover Apiaries for their ongoing support, providing supplies of honey for Carmen, Suzy and Peggy at the Five Sisters Zoo in Scotland. Thank you for this lovely big box of honeycomb which we presented to Head Keeper Lynn. As the bears are still enjoying their winter snooze, Lynn will keep the honeycomb safe until the bears get up for breakfast. Thank you Littleover Apiaries from all of us.

Lynne and honeycomb


Wildlife SOS
(December 2013 and June and December 2014 funding)

The Winton Bear Foundation is very proud to now be supporting the work of Wildlife SOS. Wildlife SOS are based in India and work tirelessly to end the spectacle of dancing bears and to care for bears saved from this distressing practice. We will continue to assist them on an ongoing basis with funds in order to help with the care of the bears in their rescue centres and to help them to create a more positive future for India’s bears.

Bear Wildlife SOS


Animals Asia (May and July 2014 funding)

The Winton Bear Foundation is very proud to be working in conjunction with Animals Asia to help promote their Peace by Piece project in Scotland.

Animals Asia’s Peace by Piece initiative is a historic breakthrough in the ongoing campaign to end bear farming and will see the charity converting a bear bile farm in Nanning, China into a sanctuary, ending the suffering of the 130 bears and their unborn cubs farmed there and releasing them from a lifetime of mental and physical torture. This ground-breaking turn of events has come about following a change of heart by the bear farm owner Mr Yan Shaohong who no longer wished to see his bears suffer and wanted to get out of the increasingly unpopular industry.

Animals Asia are required to raise £3m to transform the farm into a sanctuary in the biggest rescue of its kind, which will eventually include taking 28 of the sickest bears on the farm to the safety of their sanctuary in Chengdu where they will be given the urgent veterinary care they need. The charity will then begin the two year process to turn the farm in Nanning into a sanctuary and haven of peace for the remainder of the bears so that they can start to recover from the trauma of their ordeal on the bear farm and that their care and wellbeing will be guaranteed for the remainder of their lives.

The Winton Bear Foundation will provide support for this project, and Animals Asia’s ongoing battle to end bear farming, through fund and awareness raising until bear farming is brought to an end once and for all.


Turpentine Creek Wildlife Refuge (June 2014 funding)

In June 2014 the Winton Bear Foundation selected a brand new beneficiary to support. For the first time, we sent a donation of £100 (USD$170) to Turpentine Creek Wildlife Refuge based in Eureka Springs, Arkansas in the United States. TCWR’s mission is to provide a lifetime refuge for all rescued animals, with the care, safety, and wellbeing of the animals being the number one priority, treating them with the dignity and compassion they deserve. Although much of their work is with big cats they are also currently caring for six black bears and one Grizzly – the funds we have donated will assist with their care and we look forward to supporting them on an ongoing basis.

Bam Bam (photo copyright Turpentine Creek Wildlife Refuge)

Bam Bam
(photo copyright Turpentine Creek Wildlife Refuge)


Lions, Tigers and Bears (June 2014 funding)

In June 2014 the Winton Bear Foundation selected a new beneficiary to support. For the first time we sent a donation of £100 (USD$170) to Lions, Tigers and Bears based in Alpine, California in the United States. Lions, Tigers and Bears currently cares for four bears – Liberty, Delilah, Blossom and Sugar Bear – in their wonderful four acre ‘Black Bear Habitat’ which provides a more natural environment for its four furry occupants. We are delighted to support them for the first time and look forward to giving them ongoing support.

Liberty (photo copyright Lions, Tigers and Bears)

Liberty
(photo copyright Lions, Tigers and Bears)


Wildwood Trust (July and November 2014 funding)

In July 2014 we received an email from the Wildwood Trust in Kent, UK, informing us that they were launching an appeal to rescue two brown bears from horrendous living conditions in Bulgaria and bring them to live within the comfort and safety of their woodland. The bears were being kept in concrete pens in an abandoned bear breeding centre called Kormisosh. They were fed a bland diet and received no enrichment at all. They had never even seen a tree or walked on grass. We immediately offered to support them in any way that we could.

Wildwood Trust - peanut wheel

© Wildwood Trust

We made an initial donation of £200 to the rescue fund, then in November we held a highly successful raffle thanks to the amazing generosity of WBF supporters and were able to make a second payment of £600 to Wildwood. During the course of the raffle, we received the fantastic news that the bears had already been rescued and safely brought to the sanctuary. We were delighted to hear this news and very happy for our donation to go towards food, veterinary supplies and enrichment for the ongoing care and rehabilitation of the bears. We were sent these fabulous photos after the bears were rescued. You can only begin to imagine how happy and stimulated these bears are now. The main photo is of one of the boys playing with a big wheel Wildwood made for them – they pull down on it to make it spin and as it does, peanuts fall out! Some of the money WBF donated will go to purchasing nuts for the bears so that they can continue to benefit from this game, which builds their strength, practices logical thinking and provides them with an important, high calorie snack too. Fantastic!

All images © Wildwood Trust

Wildwood Trust - rescued bear Wildwood Trust - rescued bear
Wildwood Trust - rescued bear Wildwood Trust - rescued bear

Bear With Us (December 2014 funding)

In December 2014 we donated £100 to a new beneficiary, Bear With Us, based in Canada. Bear with Us work to rescue and rehabilitate orphaned and injured bears and currently care for two rescued ex-circus bears Yogi and Molly. Bear with Us also work to promote human-bear coexistence.

Images © Bear With Us

Yogi

Yogi

Molly

Molly


Libearty Bear Sanctuary, Romania (December 2014 funding)

We made a donation to the Libearty Bear Sanctuary in Romania in December 2014. We have already adopted their big bear Max but decided to make an additional donation of £100 towards the cost of their building a special enclosure for one of their blind bears who has been rescued from a zoo where he lived in very bad conditions. He will be given his own special enclosure to allow for his disabilities, with his own swimming pool, den and an area with grass and trees. (photos to follow)


Animals Asia, Vietnam Sanctuary (December 2014 funding)

In December 2014 we made an additional donation of £250 to Animals Asia’s Vietnam sanctuary, currently home to 110 bears rescued from bear farms. With our donation, each bear will be bought a coconut each as a special Christmas present since they loved the last ones so much. They will also be bought 9 rubber tyres, one for each bear house, enrichment that provides hours of entertainment. (photos to follow)


Free the Bears (July 2015 funding)

In July 2015 we donated £200 to a brand-new beneficiary of the Winton Bear Foundation – Free the Bears. Based in Perth, Western Australia Free the Bears is dedicated to protecting, preserving and enriching the lives of bears around the world. They currently work in six countries throughout Asia where bears are illegally captured to be butchered for their body parts, turned into medicine or bear paw soup or incarcerated in bile farms. Free the Bears employ a range of strategies including environmental education, conservation research and strengthened law enforcement to ensure that they achieve their mission to protect, preserve and enrich the lives of bears throughout the world. We are proud to make them a beneficiary of WBF and look forward to supporting them on an ongoing basis. (photo courtesy of Free the Bears)

Free the Bears

Free the Bears


Advancing Bear Care Conference 2015 Sponsorship

In 2013, the Winton Foundation for the Welfare of Bears sponsored a delegate’s registration fee enabling them to attend the Advancing Bear Care Conference held that year, in the United States. The conference is held every two years and brings together some of the greatest ‘bear’ minds in the world. The 2015 conference is being held in Vietnam at the end of October. WBF will again be providing sponsorship but this year we are doing it slightly differently to be most effective. The Bear Care Group who organise the conference want to offer less expensive registration fees for delegates from 3rd world countries, which mean for the same amount of sponsorship from us as made in 2013, more delegates can attend from countries where the bears’ needs are greatest. Therefore we are providing sponsorship of $300 (£200).


Bornean Sun Bear Conservation Centre

The first of the new beneficiaries to receive funds is the Bornean Sun Bear Conservation Centre (BSBCC) based in Malaysia. Their mission is to promote sun bear conservation in Borneo through animal welfare, conservation, rehabilitation, education and research.  They work to rescue sun bears and return them to the forest. There are currently 37 rescued bears living at the BSBCC – with a monthly food bill of $3000!  We are making an initial donation of £300 towards these costs.


The BEAR League

The next beneficiary receiving £300 is The BEAR League, based in Lake Tahoe, California. They are committed to keeping bears safe and wild in their natural habitat. They do a lot of excellent work in Bear Awareness Education – both on-line and within the local community. They will use our donation to purchase new capture equipment.

Ann Bryant (Executive Director) told us:
“When we get calls on orphan bear cubs we must rescue them quickly and safely. For that we need various different types of capture equipment – nets, kennels, catch poles etc. (Unless they are still extremely small they don’t tend to willingly climb straight into our loving arms!). We are extremely grateful for all you do to help the bears, here at Tahoe and around the entire planet.”


The Five Sisters Zoo

In December 2015 we donated £300 to the Five Sisters Zoo based in West Calder, West Lothian. Since the zoo rescued three female bears Carmen, Suzy and Peggy from life in a travelling circus we have helped fund medicine, food and enrichment for the bears. Carmen, Suzy and Peggy spent over 25 years as part of the circus, spending much of their lives in horrifically cramped cages measuring just 10m square before they were rescued from this miserable life and brought to a safe, happy and loving new home. The zoo has also been great supporters of our Humane Education project Fostering Compassion for children in foster care and kinship care, welcoming the children to meet the bears. Through learning about the bears’ stories, the children gain a greater understanding of their own circumstances and the bears are a great hit with the children.

We are so pleased to be able to help again with the care of the bears. Our donation will fund replacement boomer balls, glucosamine and special buckets to store their food in daily over the winter just in case the bears get up for a snack.


The Northern Lights Wildlife Sanctuary

In December 2015 we donated £300 to the Northern Lights Wildlife Society (NLWS) based in Smithers, BC.
NLWS work to give a second chance to wildlife in need. As well as caring for black bears, it is the only government permitted organisation allowed to work on grizzly cub rehabilitation. NLWS works to help young bears in need and care for them until they can be returned to the wild.

We are really excited to be able to send them sufficient funds to help with the cost of materials for the construction of a climbing platform and of a hammock – some fabulous enrichment for the grizzlies to enjoy. We will share photos of them as soon as they are completed


Sun Bear Outreach

A brand new beneficiary of the Winton Foundation for the Welfare of Bears is Sun Bear Outreach. Founded in 2014 by Patrick Rouxel, the mission of Sun Bear Outreach is to raise local and international awareness on the sun bears, help improve the life of captive sun bears in Indonesia, reintroduce cubs to the wild and help put an end to the use of sun bears in Indonesian circuses. Sun Bear Outreach’s new project for 2016 is to help improve the living conditions of all the bears in the care of Borneo Orangutan Survival (BOS). There are presently 48 bears in the BOS refuge of Samboja Lestari in East Kalimantan, Borneo, Indonesia, and 13 bears in the BOS refuge at Nyaru Menteng in Central Kalimantan. These 61 sun bears are all adults who will never go back to the wild. They deserve the best possible captive life we can give them and that is what Sun Bear Outreach intends to do.

The group of 19 female sun bears – that stay permanently in the two outdoor enclosures called Middle Yard and Bottom Yard – have a pool which serves both for bathing and drinking. But in the dry season, the pool water quickly gets murky and dirty. The girls urgently need a water basin they can drink from without being able to bathe in it. Our donation of £300 will fund the cost of building two long drinking water basins, one for Middle Yard and one for Bottom Yard. These will be placed close to the fence so that the staff can easily fill them up daily with a hose from the outside.


Northern Lights Wildlife Society

In June 2016 we answered an appeal by our friends at Northern Lights Wildlife Shelter for donations to help feed a “full house” of cubs. The shelter picked up a trio of orphaned cubs, adding to the 13 already in the shelter’s care. At $50 a week per bear for milk formula, their bills were soaring! We sent $300 to help feed the triplets for two weeks.

The cubs had been spotted near Chapman Lake, wandering for several days, with no mother in sight. Angelika and Peter Langen from NLWS managed to rescue all three and keep the siblings together. They will be in their care for a good few months yet, so we were glad to help with the milk costs.


MongoliAid

The Gobi bear is the rarest bear in the world today. In 2013, there were only 22 left in the wild. There are no Gobi bears in captivity. They have found a way to live in one of the most extreme environments on the planet – the only bear of any kind that dwells exclusively in desert habitat. Just a few years ago estimates put the number of Gobi Bears at as many as 50; the recent figure of 22 survivors comes from a population survey just completed by the Mongolian government and wildlife experts.

We are delighted to announce that MongoliAid International has become another new beneficiary. MongoliAid International is a small charity founded in 2009 and is funding the 2016 Gobi bear supplemental food distribution programme in conjunction with the MAMA NGO, the Gobi Bear Research Project and the GGSPA Park Administration.

Each food drop cost $2,425 USD, which includes the hire of two trucks for approx eight days, 1000L of fuel, the hire of helpers, food and a satellite phone hire. The Winton Bear Foundation will be providing funding for one of these eight days.


The smart and very special bear cub

Early this year, Heather Bacon, WBF Board Member and highly experienced bear vet, brought to our attention the plight of a little bear in Myanmar named Nyen htoo (Nyen too) meaning ‘smart one’ in Burmese. The little cub, around 5 months old, was found alone – its mother probably a victim of poachers. He was taken in by the ThaBarWa meditation centre to save him being sold on into China. He was found with a terrible swelling on his tongue making it incredibly difficult for him to eat. Heather believed the swelling was a blockage of the cubs salivary gland which was causing a build up of fluid. With treatment his chances were good, without treatment he would eventually die.

Therefore WBF donated £500 to the cost of Heather travelling to Myanmar to treat the cub and together with Free the Bears and Giving a Future Animal Aid the balance of the costs was covered. We also launched an appeal to raise funds for the ongoing care costs of the cub (please see our summer 2016 newsletter for more details).


Toilet Twinning

Back in January, after an article appeared in the Times of India, we reported on the incursion of sloth bears into the life of the local people in rural India. Many villages in this part of the world have no latrines and culture dictates that women and girls have to rise before dawn or wait until dark to go outside to relieve themselves. In the countryside they are in danger of attack by animals or bandits.

This prompted WBF to team up with the Five Sisters Zoo in West Lothian, home to rescued ex-circus bears Carmen, Suzy and Peggy, to collaborate with the well-established Toilet Twinning charity campaign which raises awareness of the sanitation crisis facing the world’s poor. WBF and Five Sisters Zoo are jointly meeting the £240 cost of sponsoring a toilet block in Parsauni Baij School in India, an area where there is a high risk of human-animal conflict. This will help to improve hygiene, reduce the possibility of attack, protect humans and bears, empower women and girls, and encourage children to attend school. With the help of Toilet Twinning, toilets in the zoo’s Brown Bear Café will be twinned with a new toilet block at the school.


Fluffy and Scruffy

Those who are familiar with our work will know we have two special adopted bears Bodo and Max. Well we’ve just adopted our 3rd and 4th – Fluffy and Scruffy at the Wildwood Trust. We will renew each of our adoptions on an annual basis, helping to raise awareness of the dreadful conditions many bears are rescued from and the organisations trying to help them.

Wildwood rescued two brown bears in November 2014 from shocking neglect in a disused bear breeding station in Bulgaria. The bears were born at the centre and had lived their entire lives in tiny barren concrete cells. They had never experienced anything other than this life, were desperately underweight and displaying signs of serious stress and anxiety. Wildwood rescued the bears and brought them to the UK where they are currently rehabilitating and can at last experience as natural a life as possible and have the chance to learn and express their natural behaviour.


Eco-Haylich

For a while now we have been looking for projects to support in Eastern Europe where many bears are still suffering, so for the first time we have sent a donation of $250 to The Eco-Haylich Wildlife Rehab based in the Ukraine. The NGO Eco-Haylich assists the development of Wildlife Rehab of the Haylich National Park in the west of Ukraine. Handicapped animals like foxes, wolves, raccoon dogs, ferrets and others which cannot be returned to the wild can find a permanent home here, with professional care, adequate diets and enough space to satisfy their needs. We are supporting their efforts to build a natural bear habitat for mistreated and abused bears and our donation will be used to fund wooden enrichment for their rescued bears.


Animals Asia’s Coconuts

Our final distribution of funds for 2016 was one of our favourites – our annual Christmas present of a coconut for each bear in the Animals Asia Vietnam sanctuary. We have done this for a number of years now and it is such a delight to see the photos of the bears enjoying their gifts. The coconuts provide great enrichment for the bears and a super tasty treat to provide hours of entertainment.